Gayle: Listen and act on concerns

Helene Gayle and Jeff Rosensweig

President and CEO of CARE, Helene Gayle speaks with Goizueta’s Jeff Rosensweig. PHOTO: Goizueta Newsroom

Helene Gayle has been a regular at Goizueta Business School, speaking often to classes and student assemblies in an effort to share her experience and help educate future leaders. The President and CEO of CARE most recently spoke about the challenges and opportunities working in developing countries — and equally important tasks in the United States.

‘”We face a lot of inequality here, in our own country,” said Gayle,speaking with Associate Professor of Finance Jeff Rosensweig and his class of MBA students. “Some of the ways in which we work overseas we should bring here to this country.”

Gayle said part of CARE’s international success is working inside other cultures.

“A big part of it is being educated… Not turning a blind eye to [the] issues,” she said. “”If you listen to people, and are sensitive to what they have to say, you don’t make too many mistakes.”

Gayle, medical doctor and holder of multiple degrees, said she sees value in business working alongside traditional aid groups like CARE, famous for the “CARE Package” post World War II.

“It’s looking at this in a holistic way,” she said. “Let’s look at where aid can be most effective and then let’s look at what else is in the tool kit.

“My real passion was how to make a social difference so I headed in that direction in terms of my career path. That said, these days, the blurring lines between the social sector and business sector are apparent. You see more and more businesses that understand they can do well by doing good. They can use the generation of wealth to actually create social value. Economic value and social value can go hand-in-hand.”

Schwab-Pomerantz talks financial security

Carrie Schwab-Pomerantz

Carrie Schwab-Pomerantz talks to guests and Goizueta students about financial security. PHOTO: Allison Sherriffs

Saving money is not getting any easier.

The world is full of ever-complicated financial models and investment methods. Making sense of it all can be a daunting tasks.

Carrie Schwab-Pomerantz, President of Charles Schwab Foundation SVP of Charles Schwab and Co., Inc., recognizes this and has made an effort to educate all ages. 

“It’s time to crunch numbers and face reality,” she said. “Learn to live below your means and focus on saving.”

Schwab addressed a standing-room-only crowd April 8 at Goizueta, sharing details of her new book: The Charles Schwab Guide to Finances After Fifty: Answers to Your Most Important Money Questions.

She  spearheaded two nationally-recognized financial education programs in collaboration with the Boys & Girls Clubs of America and the AARP Foundation. In 2010, she was appointed by President Obama to the President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability and served as chair of the council’s Partnership Committee until early 2013.

Schwab said men and women should start saving 10 percent of their income for retirement. Waiting until age 30 can increase that to 20 percent just to “catch up.” Wait until age 40, that’s 30 percent, and so on.

“The sooner you start, the easier it is and it won’t infringe as much on your lifestyle if you start early,” she said.

SE@G helps drive investments in entrepreneurship

On April 1, Social Enterprise @ Goizueta (SE@G) hosted a unique luncheon with members of the business and non-profit community. Its mission? Connect those interested in doing more to help developing economies.

Guests from non-profits and big business alike visited Goizueta to meet Randall Kempner, Executive Director of the Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs (ANDE),

According to its website, ANDE and its member organizations “propel entrepreneurship in emerging markets” by providing financial, educational and business support — particularly toward small businesses. ANDE launched in 2009 with 34 members and now includes more than 250 organizations in more than 150 countries.

Kempner provided an overview of ANDE’s cause and encouraged those in attendance to share their work in social entrepreneurship. He said small businesses can make a big impact in developing countries, noting that such business account for half GDP in larger, developed nations.

For more on ANDE and its mission, click here.

About Social Enterprise @ Goizueta

The focus of Social Enterprise @ Goizueta (SE@G) is that of applying business acumen and market-based solutions to achieve meaningful and enduring societal impacts. By actively working across the spectrum of for-profit, nonprofit and hybrid organizations, our faculty and students become participants in important conversations and debates that are taking place in business schools around the world.

Undergraduate program again in Businessweek Top 10

best-bschools-2014ATLANTA (April 4, 2014)Emory University’s Goizueta Business School ranked ninth in Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2014 Ranking of Best Undergraduate Business Schools released today. This is the ninth-straight year the program has ranked in the Top 10. Additionally, the undergraduate program received high marks in student satisfaction (fifth overall) and academic quality (fifth overall).

“As a byproduct of our continuous focus on qualitative improvements in our offerings, our strong hope is that we will continue to be recognized amongst the nation’s very best undergraduate business programs,” said Andrea Hershatter, Senior Associate Dean and Director of the Undergraduate Business Program. “Given the historic volatility of the underlying surveys, we remain extremely gratified to be one

of only a tiny number of schools that have been listed in the top 10 since the ranking’s inception.”

The Bloomberg Businessweek ranking is a compilation of several components, including student and recruiter surveys, median starting salaries for graduates and the number of alumni programs send to top MBA programs. Also included are academic quality rankings combining average SAT scores, student-faculty ratios, class size, percentage of students with internships and number of hours students spend on class work.

Click here for complete rankings.

 

About Emory University’s Goizueta Business School
Emory University’s Goizueta Business School is one of the nation’s only schools with four, top-20 ranked degree programs. The school offers a unique, community-oriented environment paired with an academic prestige and rigor shared with the international acclaim of Emory University. Goizueta trains business leaders of today and tomorrow with an Undergraduate degree program, a Two-Year Full-Time MBA, a One-Year MBA, an Evening MBA, an Executive MBA (Weekend and Modular formats), a Doctoral degree and a portfolio of non-degree Emory Executive Education courses. The school is named for the late Roberto C. Goizueta, former Chairman and CEO of The Coca-Cola Company.  For more information, visit goizueta.emory.edu and follow us on Twitter at @emorygoizueta.

EmoryMAC focuses on big data, visualization

EmoryMAC 2014

Marketers from around Atlanta and the southeast gathered to discuss trends and the future at this year’s EmoryMAC conference. PHOTO: Allison Shirreffs

“It’s not about data, it’s about the stories you will tell with the data.”

Google’s Saket Kumar spoke with an almost inspiring tone, encouraging the marketers in the room to think beyond the numbers.

Thus was the tone of the Emory Marketing Analytics Center Spring Conference on March 21.

Each year the center hosts hundreds from around the Southeast eager to learn best practices and trends in a now data-rich environment.

“This year we had some very well-received presentations from representatives of firms who had not presented in prior years, including IBM/Target Corporation on retail assortment optimization, Chick-fil-A on new product testing, and Google on making data work for you,” said Doug Bowman, a Goizueta professor and co-director of the center.

Kumar encouraged attendees to think of ways to visualize data. He said it requires curiosity, an understanding of math (or ability to see patterns), domain knowledge and as much organizational knowledge as possible.

“If you can not show it to people who aren’t quantitative and make an argument, it’s no good,” he said.